Northern hemisphere snow cover • Earth.com

Last update: February 16th, 2020 at 8:00 am

Today’s Image of the Day comes from the NASA Earth Observatory and features a look at snow cover in the northern hemisphere.

This image was actually taken exactly 16 years ago in February 2002, captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Terra satellite.

The snow cover can be seen from space blanketing all of Canada and parts of the midwestern United States and Rocky Mountains.

The Northern Hemisphere is the half of Earth that is north of the Equator. For other planets in the Solar System, north is defined as being in the same celestial hemisphere relative to the invariable plane of the solar system as Earth’s North Pole.

Owing to the Earth’s axial tilt, winter in the Northern Hemisphere lasts from the December solstice (typically December 21 UTC) to the March equinox (typically March 20 UTC), while summer lasts from the June solstice through to the September equinox (typically on 23 September UTC). The dates vary each year due to the difference between the calendar year and the astronomical year.

Its surface is 60.7% water, compared with 80.9% water in the case of the Southern Hemisphere, and it contains 67.3% of Earth’s land.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

Fresh News coming
your way, Weekly

The biggest news about our planet
delivered to you each day