‘Ekoko (Chamaesyce celastroides var. kaenana)

AttributeValue
Accepted symbolCHCEK
KingdomPlantae
SubkingdomTracheobionta
Super DivisionSpermatophyta
DivisionMagnoliophyta
ClassMagnoliopsida
OrderEuphorbiales
FamilyEuphorbiaceae
GenusChamaesyce
SpeciesChamaesyce celastroides var. kaenana
Common Name'Ekoko
DurationPerennial
HabitatTree, Shrub

Nativity status map

Other resources

Akoko (Chamaesyce) belong to the Spurge or Euphorbia family (Euphorbiaceae).There are sixteen native species of -akoko (Chamaesyce spp.)–all of which are endemic to the Hawaiian Islands. A number of -akoko are either vulnerable, rare or endangered, with two considered extinct. Several have beautiful foliage and range in size from very prostrate sub-shrubs such as Chamaesyce degeneri to Chamaesyce olowaluana, which are nearly 30-foot trees–perhaps the tallest in the entire genus of 250 species worldwide!The two other native members in Euphorbiaceae are po-ol- (Claoxylon sandwicense) and a native tree euphorbia (Euphorbia haeleeleana). Some well known non-native relatives are the Castor oil plant (Ricinus communis), kukui (Aleurites moluccana), poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima), cassava (Manihot esculenta), and the Par- rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) from which latex comes.This -akoko (Chamaesyce celastroides) is the by far the most variable and widespread of all the Hawaiian Chamaesyce. The erect capsules (fruits) distinguish them from other species, except C. herbstii and C. rockii, which have distinctively larger fruits.