Your body’s natural detox system


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions series and features a look at your body’s natural detox system.

There are an endless number of detox products available that are marketed as miracle juices and smoothies that can clear your body of toxins.

But the truth is, the body’s natural detox abilities are unparalleled, thanks to an interlocked system that includes your stomach, liver, kidneys, lungs, and intestines.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: American Chemical Society

How deep-sea fish can see in twilight conditions


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the University of Queensland and features a look at a new type of cell that has been discovered in the eyes of deep-sea fish.

The cell was found in deep-sea pearlside fish, whose eyes are especially adapted to see in twilight conditions.

“Previously it was thought that pearlsides had retinas composed entirely of rods, but our new study has found this isn’t the case,” said Dr Fanny de Busserolles. “Humans use their cones during the day our rods at night, but during twilight, although not ideal, we use a combination of both. Pearlsides, being active mainly during twilight, have developed a completely different solution.”

The discovery helps scientists better understand vision in a wide variety of light conditions and how different animals see the world.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: Queensland Brain Institute, The University of Queensland

Image Credit: Dr Fanny de Busserolles

The science of fake blood in movies


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions series and features a look how Hollywood creates the most realistic fake blood for movies.

Blood gets its red color due to a protein called hemoglobin, which is made up of smaller subunits called hemes. When hemes bind to iron molecules, the iron molecules bond to oxygen. This interaction between oxygen and iron turns blood red, and the more oxygen present, the redder the blood gets.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: American Chemical Society

Predicting earthquakes and aftershocks in Southern California


Today’s Video of the Day comes from researchers who have used supercomputers to improve seismic forecasts and predict the impact of earthquakes and aftershocks in Southern California.

The collaborative team featured researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey and Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) and resources from the University of Texas, Austin, the Texas Advanced Computing Center, and the University of Southern California Center for High-Performance Computing.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: Sean Cunningham, TACC

How old is planet Earth?


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions series and features a look at how scientists determined the correct age of planet Earth.

It turns out that Earth is roughly 4.565 billion years old (give or take a few million years). But the more interesting story is how scientists figured out the answer, after thousands of years of attempts.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: American Chemical Society

NTU launches Singapore’s largest wind turbine


Today’s Video of the Day comes from Nanyang Technological University (NTU), who have launched Singapore’s largest wind turbine.

The new turbine measures roughly 140 feet in height and generates 100 kilowatts of power, which is enough to power 45 different homes. It is also sensitive enough to generate power with winds as slow as 3 meters per second.

“The deployment of Singapore’s first wind turbine is a big milestone in the nation’s commitment in developing clean energy technologies for the region,” said Professor Lam Khin Yong, NTU’s Acting Provost, Chief of Staff and Vice President for Research. “As a leading global university, NTU is proud to support Singapore’s efforts in meeting its sustainability objectives and pave the way towards a greener future.”

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: Nanyang Technological University

NASA’s ICON Explorer to monitor the mysterious ionosphere


Today’s Video of the Day features a look at NASA’s new ICON Explorer, which will launch in December 2017 and monitor the ionosphere.

The ionosphere is home to the aurora, astronauts, radio signals, and satellites, but is still not well understood. Scientists from NASA and UC Berkeley have now teamed up to launch the Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) to study the constant changes in the ionosphere.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: NASA

How breast cancer treatment has evolved over time


In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month, today’s Video of the Day features a look at all of the progress that has been made in understanding and treating breast cancer.

100 years ago, the only treatment available would have been a primitive form of radiation or extremely invasive surgery. Luckily, now there are a multitude of treatment options for breast cancer, including chemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy, and hormone therapy.

The clip comes courtesy of the American Chemical Society’s Reactions series.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: American Chemical Society

ESA launches the Sentinel 5-P satellite to monitor air pollution


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the European Space Agency (ESA) and features a look at the new Sentinel 5-P satellite.

The new satellite was launched by ESA on Friday October 13, 2017. It will be responsible for monitoring air pollution and air quality, including levels of sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, nitrogen dioxide, and ozone.

The data will be used for air quality forecasts, UV forecasts, and aviation safety, as well as the study of the Earth’s atmosphere and climate change.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: European Space Agency

New sensor measures when your body starts burning fat


Today’s Video of the Day comes from ETH Zurich and features a look at a new sensor that can measure when your body starts to burn fat during exercise.

When the body begins the process of fat burning, an organic compound called acetone is released. The new sensor measures acetone concentration in expelled breath in real time, which indicates how much fat is burned. The sensor is coated with nanoparticles that interact with the acetone, so when the participant blows into the instrument, the results populate immediately.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: ETH Zurich

When flashes of light occur above the storm


Today’s Video of the Day comes from NASA’s ScienceCasts series and features a look at transient luminous events, when flashes of light take place above a storm.

These flashes, also known as blue jets, are the result of activity occurring inside the storm, but they stretch above the storm toward space. When researchers recorded these events to learn more, they found that during 160 seconds of video footage, 245 blue flashes were recorded, equaling a rate of 90 per minute.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: NASA

How to cook an egg with alcohol


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions series a features a look at how to cook an egg with alcohol.

Eggs are delicious, nutritious, and as it turns out, they’re also super fun! This clip also shows you how you can make an egg bounce like a basketball using vinegar and how you can make green eggs. Just remember not to lick or eat the egg once you’re done.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: American Chemical Society