Space mission observes an interplanetary shock • Earth.com

Space mission observes an interplanetary shock

01-18-2020


Space mission observes an interplanetary shock Today’s Video of the Day from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center shows a computer animation of solar wind, a continuous steam of particles released by the Sun.

When a fast stream of solar wind overtakes a slower stream, it creates a shock wave.

The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission (MMS) recently made the first precise measurements of an interplanetary shock using high-resolution instruments. Interplanetary shocks are a type of collisionless shock — ones where particles transfer energy through electromagnetic fields instead of directly bouncing into one another. These collisionless shocks are a phenomenon found throughout the universe, including in supernovae, black holes and distant stars.

The Magnetospheric Multiscale mission — MMS  has spent the past four years using high-resolution instruments to see what no other spacecraft can. Recently, MMS made the first high-resolution measurements of an interplanetary shock. These shocks, made of particles and electromagnetic waves, are launched by the Sun. Space mission observes an interplanetary shock These collisionless shocks are a phenomenon found throughout the universe, including in supernovae, black holes and distant stars. MMS studies collisionless shocks around Earth to gain a greater understanding of shocks across the universe

By Chrissy Sexton, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

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