Dozens of octopus moms and their eggs on the ocean floor


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the Field Museum and features a look at a large group of octopus moms and their eggs discovered on the seafloor far deeper than scientists would’ve ever expected to find them.

The octopus clique was found almost 2 miles underwater, about 100 miles off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica in an area known as the Dorado Outcrop.

“When I first saw the photos, I was like ‘No, they shouldn’t be there! Not that deep and not that many of them,” said Janet Voight, Associate Curator of Zoology at the Field Museum and author of the new study.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: WHOI’s ALVIN dive 4779, Katie Inderbitzen

Kangaroo rat spotted for the first time in 30 years


Today’s Video of the Day comes from researchers at the San Diego Natural History Museum (The Nat) and the Terra Peninsular A.C. who have spotted the San Quintin kangaroo rat in Baja California.

The San Quintin kangaroo rat (Dipodomys gravipes) was listed as endangered by the Mexican government in 1994, as it had not been seen since 1986. It measures about 5 inches in length and is an herbivore with strong hind feet that allow it to bound around like a kangaroo.

The species was thought to have gone extinct as yet another casualty of agricultural conservation, as much of its native habitat had been converted to tomato and strawberry fields.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: Sula Vanderplank, San Diego Natural History Museum

The uneven distribution of California stream restoration


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the University of California, Santa Cruz and a features a look at how stream restoration projects are unevenly distributed along the central California coast.

According to a new study, stream restoration tends to be clustered in areas with particular ecological need, either with an abundance of fish or damaged habitats.

However, the study also found that restoration also tends to take place in areas where human communities are whiter, wealthier, and more educated.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: University of California, Santa Cruz, Nick Gonzales

What Earth’s supercontinents might look like in the future


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the American Geophysical Union and features a look at how the cyclical strengthening and weakening of ocean tides likely forms supercontinents on Earth every 400 to 600 million years.

According to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters, tectonic movement determines both the placement of continents and the size and shape of oceans. As tectonic plates push land masses to form supercontinents, ocean basins will close in synch.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: American Geophysical Union, Hannah Davies

Hyderabad in southern India


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the European Space Agency’s Earth from Space series and features a look at the city of Hyderabad in southern India.

Hyderabad is the capital of the Indian state of Telangana and stretches 250 square miles along the Musi River. The city is home to roughly 6.7 million people and is the fourth most populous city in India.

These images were captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: European Space Agency

Detecting the threat of landslides from space


Today’s Video of the Day comes from NASA Goddard and features a look at how scientists can use satellites to detect the threat of landslides in advance.

Scientists have designed a new model called the Landslide Hazard Assessment for Situational Awareness which estimates which regions have a moderate to high chance of landslides every 30 minutes.

The model tracks global rainfall, which is the most widespread and frequent trigger of landslides, combined with a landslide susceptibility map identifying steep slopes, deforestation, and weak foundations.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: NASA Goddard

Rare elephant twins seen in Tanzania


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the Wildlife Conservation Society and features a look at a rare pair of elephant twins spotted in Tanzania.

The twin elephant calves were identified by a team of researchers who have been studying Tanzania’s Tarangire National Park for the past 25 years.

The twins, one male and one female, are said to be doing well and are approximately eight months old.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: WCS Tanzania Program

Lake Baikal: The world’s largest freshwater lake


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the European Space Agency (ESA) and features a look at the largest freshwater lake on Earth: Lake Baikal.

Lake Baikal is located in southern Siberia and is usually completely covered by ice from January and May, and in some parts, the ice can be up to 6 feet thick.

These images were captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: European Space Agency

Smartphone production linked to human-induced earthquakes


Today’s Video of the Day comes from AXA Research Fund and features a look at how the production of smartphones can actually increase the likelihood of earthquakes.

Host Greg Foot visits the mountains of California to learn about how the mining of rare earth minerals used to manufacture smartphones can increase the odds of human-induced earthquakes.

According to the research, there are 17 rare earth metals in the world, 16 of which are used in mobile phones.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: AXA Research Fund

The after-rain smell is called petrichor


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions series and explains how the distinct smell that fills the air after a fresh rain is called petrichor.

Petrichor is derived from the Greek language and means “blood of stones,” originally coined in the 1960s by Australian scientists Richard Thomas and Isabel Bear.

The two main sources of the scent are plants and bacteria living in soil. Petrichor refers to the yellow oil that can be extracted from rocks, clay, and soil and contains fatty acids from plants.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: American Chemical Society

Why careful water management is crucial to life on Earth


Today’s Video of the Day comes from the European Space Agency (ESA) and features a look at the importance of proper water management on Earth.

Overexploitation, pollution, and climate change are just a few of the pressures put on Earth’s water supply.

Water resource managers require sufficient tools and information to ensure the right quantity and quality of water is available for everyone.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)

New satellites track how the poles are changing


Today’s Video of the Day comes from NASA Goddard and features a look at two new satellites designed to track how Earth’s poles are changing.

Both satellite missions will specifically monitor how ice sheets are melting and shrinking. Over the last several decades, ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica have rapidly lost ice mass. Scientists say that this could raise global sea level by 1 to 4 feet by 2100.

By Rory Arnold, Earth.com Staff Writer

Video Credit: NASA Goddard