Alligator sinensis • Earth.com
doc1709.jpg
12-22-2016

Alligator sinensis

Alligator sinensis NatureServe Explorer Species Reports — NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports — ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

FWS Digital Media Library — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video. The Chinese alligator, also known as the Yangtze alligator, China alligator, or historically the muddy dragon, is a crocodilian endemic to China. It and the American alligator are the only living species in the genus Alligator of the family Alligatoridae. Dark gray or black in color with a fully armored body, the Chinese alligator grows to 1.5–2.1 metres in length and weighs 36–45 kilograms as an adult. It brumates in burrows in winter and is nocturnal in summer. Mating occurs in early summer, with females most commonly producing 20–30 eggs, which are smaller than those of any other crocodilian.The species is an opportunistic feeder, primarily eating fish and invertebrates. A vocal species, adults bellow during the mating season and young vocalize to communicate with their parents and other juveniles. Captive specimens have reached age 70, and wild specimens can live to over 50.

Detailed information
Full Name: Chinese alligator (Alligator sinensis)
Where found: Wherever found
Critical Habitat:N/A
Species Group:Reptiles
Current listing status
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
Endangered 06/14/1976 Foreign (Headquarters) Wherever found
  • Countries in which the the Chinese alligator, Wherever found is known to occur: China
Federal register documents
Recovery
No recovery information is available for the Chinese alligator.
You might also like
News coming your way
The biggest news about our planet delivered to you each day