Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii ingens • Earth.com
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12-22-2016

Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii ingens

Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii ingens NatureServe Explorer Species Reports — NatureServe Explorer is a source for authoritative conservation information on more than 50,000 plants, animals and ecological communtities of the U.S and Canada. NatureServe Explorer provides in-depth information on rare and endangered species, but includes common plants and animals too. NatureServe Explorer is a product of NatureServe in collaboration with the Natural Heritage Network.

ITIS Reports — Corynorhinus (=Plecotus) townsendii ingens ITIS (the Integrated Taxonomic Information System) is a source for authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world. This bat requires large cavities for roosting; these may include abandoned buildings and mines, caves, and basal cavities of trees. During summer, these bats inhabit rocky crevices, caves, and derelict buildings. In winter, they hibernate in a variety of dwellings, including rocky crevices, caves, tunnels, mineshafts, spaces under loose tree bark, hollow trees, and buildings. During the summer, males and females occupy separate roosting sites; males are typically solitary, while females form maternity colonies, where they raise their pups. A maternity colony may range in size from 12 bats to 200, although in the eastern United States, colonies of 1,000 or more have been formed. During the winter, these bats hibernate, often when temperatures are around 32 to 53 °F (around 0 °C to 11.5 °C.) Hibernation occurs in tightly packed clusters, which could possibly help stabilize body temperatures against the cold. Males often hibernate in warmer places than females and are more easily aroused and active in winter than females. The bats are often interrupted from their sleep because they tend to wake up frequently and move around in the cave or move from one cave entirely to another. Before hibernation, C. townsendii individuals increase their body mass to compensate for the food they do not eat during the winter

FWS Digital Media Library — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s National Digital Library is a searchable collection of selected images, historical artifacts, audio clips, publications, and video.

Detailed information
Full Name: Ozark Big-Eared bat (Corynorhinus (=plecotus) townsendii ingens)
Where found: Wherever found
Critical Habitat:N/A
Species Group:Mammals
Current listing status
Status Date Listed Lead Region Where Listed
Endangered 11/30/1979 Southwest Region (Region 2) Wherever found
  • States/US Territories in which the Ozark Big-Eared bat, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur: Arkansas , Missouri , Oklahoma
  • US Counties in which the Ozark Big-Eared bat, Wherever found is known to or is believed to occur: View All
  • USFWS Refuges in which the Ozark Big-Eared bat, Wherever found is known to occur: Ozark Plateau National Wildlife Refuge
Recovery
To learn more about critical habitat please see http://ecos.fws.gov/crithab
Date
Title
Plan Action Status
Plan Status
03/28/1995 Ozark Big-Eared Bat Revised Recovery Plan View Implementation Progress Final Revision 1
Date
Title
Plan Action Status
Plan Status
03/28/1995 Ozark Big-Eared Bat Revised Recovery Plan View Implementation Progress Final Revision 1
Date
Citation Page
Title
Document Type
04/21/2006 71 FR 20714 20716 5-Year Review of 25 Southwestern Species
  • Notice 5-year Review, Initiation
Date
Title
05/22/2008 Ozark Big-eared Bat 5-Year Review
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